Legal Rights & Responsibilities

 

 

 

Fact & Policy

 

Resources

 

~The Face of Immigration in Tennessee~

Welcome and Warning
Posted July 2004

Welcome to this website on “The Faces of Immigration in Tennessee.” A few words of explanation and warning are in order.

This is no longer an active web site. It was created as part of a law student project carried out in 1999 by students in my class on Community Partnership Development at the
University of Tennessee College of Law. Although neither the students nor I have the resources that would be required to maintain the site as an active and updated source of current information, I have decided to leave it online, at least for now. There are three reasons why I believe visitors may find the site of interest, even though it is no longer being actively maintained or updated.

First, it is a record of innovative student work. In 1999, a number of people scattered around our state and region were attempting to understand and respond to the unprecedented increase in the Latino/Latina population in
Tennessee. But the issue was quite new, and this effort represented an early public statement about it. I am proud of what my students accomplished, and this site offers a way to let others have access to their efforts. (To see a web page that I have built in the meantime to display other examples of my students’ work, please visit http:www.law.utk.edu/library/franweb/default.html) Second, although some of the more topical information is outdated (and should not be relied upon!), there are several short essays and more general observations on the site that remain timely and interesting on the subject of Latina/Latino immigration in the Southeast and Tennessee. As I write this Welcome and Warning in July 2004, the demographic changes in question are even more evident than they were in 1999, but they still feel new to many of us native-born Tennesseans. Accordingly, the issues surrounding new immigration in Tennessee are still very much alive, and the site should be of interest to people seeking to understand these issues. Third, the site itself provides a kind of snapshot record regarding the state of Tennessee immigrant affairs, at least as perceived by my students, at one particular moment in time. Given the fast rate of change in these matters, this snapshot moment seems worth preserving as an historical artifact.

Introduction from students, 1999: In the spring of 1999, twelve law students at the University of Tennessee signed up to take a seminar offered by Professor Fran Ansley. We wanted to find out about the experiences of Latino immigrants with the legal system here, we hoped to identify any special needs they might have for legal representation or for education about their legal rights and responsibilities. We also wanted to find out how the legal profession and the justice system were or were not responding to these new circumstances. Finally, we hoped that by the end of the semester we could actually make a difference in some small but concrete way.

Over the course of the semester we learned a great deal. We became convinced that Latino immigrants themselves are often hungry for additional information to help them understand and deal with their new environment. We also learned that many native-born Tennesseeans want to learn more about their new neighbors, about what brought them here, and about what they are encountering in the workplace and the community. There are a number of agencies, organizations, and individuals who are now working in Tennessee to serve, reach out to, and organize Latino members of the community. All of these players have voiced a need for more information and for better linkages with other people and organizations that are taking up these issues in Tennessee and elsewhere.

The web page you are looking at was designed to address this need. It is one of the concrete steps that our class has taken, first launched in March 1999, and still a work-in-progress. We hope that visitors will find that this site provides access to helpful information, and we welcome your suggestions for additions and changes. To give us your feedback, EMAIL US.

The web page is currently divided into four sections: Legal Rights and Responsibilities, Fact and Policy, Resources, and Interactive Forums.  

The first section, Legal Rights and Responsibilities, includes information on Banks and Money, Consumer Law, Criminal Law, Discrimination, Domestic Violence, Education, Driver Information, Education, Employment, Family Law, Farmworkers, Health Care, Housing, Immigration, Language Access, Public Benefits, and Taxes.

A second section, Fact and Policy, includes immigration facts and policy information.

A third section, Resources, includes links and contact information for local, state, and federal immigration resources.

The web page also includes several Interactive Forums facilitating a place for individuals interested in immigration to communicate with one another. Those forums include a page for Immigrants' Stories, a Chat Room, Message Boards and editorials for discussion of Hot Topics and Opposing Opinions, and links to Spanish Audio available on the web.

 

 

 

BANKS & MONEY/ CONSUMER LAW/ CRIMINAL LAW/ DISCRIMINATION/ DOMESTIC VIOLENCE/ EDUCATION/ DRIVER INFORMATION/ EDUCATION/ EMPLOYMENT/ FAMILY LAW/ FARMWORKERS/ HEALTH CARE/ HOUSING/ IMMIGRATION/ LANGUAGE ACCESS/ PUBLIC BENEFITS/ TAXES/ MISCELLANEOUS/ IMMIGRATION FACTS/ IMMIGRATION POLICY/ CONTACTS/ LINKS/ IMMIGRANTS' STORIES/ CHAT ROOM/ MESSAGE BOARDS/ HOT TOPICS/ OPPOSING OPINIONS/ SPANISH AUDIO/

 

           

Click here to see latest additions to this site. Last addition 05/28/00

Interactive Forums

 

 

                           

                             

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Copyright ©  1999 by Ansley, Buck, Padawer, Reeves, Community Development Class