Speech Communication Curriculum

 

Speech Communication 100: Introduction to Speech Communication (3).

This course surveys the various arenas of speech communication, i.e., intrapersonal, interpersonal, public, group, and organizational communication. Readings illustrate the various theories underlying speech experiences as well as acquainting the student with the breadth of the field. Special attention is given to the components of verbal communication, nonverbal communication, and listening. Students may take part in a symposium as part of the study of group discussion. Evaluation is based on examinations covering the textual materials, quizzes, and participation in the symposium.

 

Speech Communication 200: Developing Speech Confidence (1).

This course covers the principles and techniques for coping with apprehension about communicating. The course is designed for students who are concurrently enrolled in other 200-level courses which involve some aspect of performance which the student might find difficult to achieve because of nervousness. Students will meet for three hours a week for five weeks at the beginning of the semester. Evaluation will be based on one examination and one paper which will require the student to discuss the application of the principles to his/her communication.

 

Speech Communication 210: Public Speaking (3).

This course involves the preparation and delivery of informative and persuasive speeches. Topics include research, organization, adapting to an audience, topic selection, reasoning, and evaluating the discourse of others. Evaluation is based on examinations and at least three student speaking experiences. [A special section of this course for students high in speech anxiety is available in Fall and Spring semesters.]

 

Speech Communication 220: Interpersonal Communication (3).

This course studies the human transaction in face-to-face settings. An understanding of basic interpersonal strategies is encouraged through classroom activities, readings, and analyses of communication inventories. Topics include: intrapersonal communication, basic communication strategies, communication and roles, and conflict in interpersonal communication. Evaluation is based on examinations over readings and writing assignments which require the student to explore his/her communication.

 

Speech Communication 230: Listening (3).

This course studies the principles and techniques of listening. Focuses on theoretical and practical listening skills.

 

Speech Communication 240: Business and Professional Communication (3).

This course covers the basic principles of communication within organizations. Topics and activities may include organizational/communication theory, group problem solving, case studies, interviewing, and formal presentations. [A special section of this course for students high in speech anxiety is available in Fall and Spring semesters.]

 

Speech Communication 260: Communication and Society (3).

This course studies communication strategies and public opinion, with emphasis on communication media (posters, film, songs, demonstrations, drama, and public address).

 

Speech Communication 270: Argumentation and Debate (3).

This course studies reasoned decision making with emphasis on analysis of debate propositions, evidence, reasoning, constructing cases, and refuting and defending arguments. Experience is provided in two debate formats: standard style and cross-examination style. This is the basic course in the subject matter, and no previous debating or public speaking experience is required.

 

Speech Communication 280: Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3).

This course covers the principles and performance techniques applicable to the interpretation of prose, poetry, and dramatic literature. Evaluation is based on one examination, three written analyses, three individual and two group performances.

 

Speech Communication 295: Communication Research Methods (3).

This course surveys contemporary methods used for research in Speech Communication. Emphasis will be on interpreting and evaluating communication research reports.

 

Speech Communication 300: Nonverbal Communication (3).

This course explores the origins, usage, and coding of nonverbal behavior. The functional importance of nonverbal communication is examined in terms of the use of space, body language, touch, and artifactual communication (the use of objects to communicate). The cultural importance of this code and its relation to verbal communication are underlying dimensions of the study of nonverbal communication.

 

Speech Communication 310: Persuasion (3).

This course studies the methods which contribute to effective persuasion. Topics include credibility, message construction, and receiver variables. The primary focus is on analysis of variables which enhance or inhibit persuasion. The course does not involve student speaking performances.

 

Speech Communication 320: Interpersonal Communication Processes (3).

This course analyzes the social forces which affect communication in relationships. The dynamics of relational communication is studied in light of changing forms and values, role demands (past, present, future), and relationship trends (family, friends, others). Prerequisite: Speech Communication 220.

 

Speech Communication 330: Group Communication (3).

This course studies small group decision making. Topics include argumentation and evidence, norms and rules, roles and leadership, types of group interaction, groupthink, reticence, and nonverbal communication. Assignments include a panel discussion, a problem-solving discussion, and a written presentation of a case study of decision making.

 

Speech Communication 350: Communication Theory (3).

This course examines the process by which communication theories are developed, listed, and modified. It is designed to help students read and understand communication research reports, and should be taken prior to or concurrent with other upper division courses.

 

Speech Communication 360: Topics in Communication and Society (3).

The content of this course will vary from term to term. Topics will include such communication forms as songs, photographs, demonstrations, plays, films, and speeches. The focus of the course will be on the history and social functions of the communication forms. The course may be repeated with the consent of the department to a maximum credit of 6 hours.

 

Speech Communication 370: Evidence and Argumentation (3).

This course deals with the concept of evidence in public controversies, uses and sources of evidence, and conditions affecting credibility. Assignments in the course include a case study.

 

Speech Communication 380: Advanced Oral Interpretation (3).

This course involves both individual and group performances of prose literature and poetry. Prerequisite: Speech Communication 280 or permission of instructor. Writing-emphasis course.

 

Speech Communication 390: History of Rhetorical Theory (3).

This course surveys communication theories from 5th-century Athens to the present. Topics include the Sophistic movement, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Quintilian, medieval preaching, Erasmus, the scientific rhetoric of the 17th century, and such contemporary writers as Perelman and Burke.

 

Speech Communication 400: Topics in Speech Communication (3).

The content of this course will vary from term to term, affording opportunities to offer subject matter not covered in existing courses. Topics and scope of subject matter are determined by the Department. Topics such as Gender and Communication, Family Communication, and Rhetorical Criticism of Contemporary Feature Films are among the variety of subjects proposed for this course. The course may be repeated to a maximum credit of 6 hours, only three of which may be counted toward the major.

 

Speech Communication 420: Communication and Conflict (3).

This course offers a communication perspective on human conflict and the tools for resolving conflict. Topics explored in the course include climate and conflict, conflict cycles, conflict strategies, conflict and credibility, diagnosing conflicts, and resolving conflicts. These topics are examined in interpersonal, family, and group settings.

 

Speech Communication 425: Interpersonal Health Communication (3).

This course studies interpersonal communication in health care settings. Topics include provider-client interactions, social support groups, stigma and disease, and contemporary models explaining the use of health-related information.

 

Speech Communication 430: Family Communication (3).

This course studies the dynamics of interactions within family systems, marriage, and parent-child relationships. Study of verbal and nonverbal communication processes, patterns, and problems. Prerequisite: Child and Family Studies 220 or Speech Communication 320 or consent of instructor. (Same as Child and Family Studies 430).

 

Speech Communication 440: Organizational Communication (3).

This course studies organizational settings and those variables of the communication process that affect the quality of human interaction both within and outside the organization.

 

Speech Communication 445: Internship (1-3).

Supervised career-related experiences using Speech Communication theories and techniques in government and for profit and non-profit organizations, culminating in a written and oral report. Reserved for Junior/Senior level majors with at least a 3.0 GPA, or by special permission of Internship Director. S/NC only. May be repeated; Maximum 6 hours. Major credit limited to 3 hours. (For more information on internships, see page 20).

 

Speech Communication 450: Propaganda (3).

This course studies the political, commercial, and social propaganda in the United States from World War I to the present. This is a writing emphasis course.

 

Speech Communication 465: Studies in Rhetorical History and Criticism (3).

This course involves the historical and critical study of public address. It provides a rhetorical perspective to students of history, political science, sociology, and other areas of the Humanities and Social Sciences. The course may be repeated to a maximum credit of 6 hours.

 

Speech Communication 466: Rhetoric of the Women's Rights Movement to 1930 (3).

Historical and critical study of public address in the campaign for woman's rights in the United States from the 1830s through the 1920s. (Same as Women's Studies 466.) Writing emphasis course.

 

Speech Communication 469: Freedom of Speech (3).

This course presents historical and philosophical perspectives on freedom of expression as well as the legal issues in free speech controversies in the U.S.

 

Speech Communication 476: Rhetoric of the Contemporary Feminist Movement (3).

Historical and critical study of rhetoric in campaign for women's rights in the United States from the 1940's to present. (Same as Women's Studies 467.) Writing emphasis course.

 

Speech Communication 480: Ensemble Interpretation (3).

This course emphasizes the performance of literary texts as a means of studying literature and a non- traditional approach to theatre. Students will participate in a variety of oral interpretation group activities, including choral speaking, readers and chamber theatre.

 

Speech Communication 490: Topics in Rhetorical Theory (3).

The content varies in this course. Emphasis will be on a particular period, such as Greek, eighteenth century, or contemporary. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

 

Speech Communication 491: Foreign Study (1-15).

Prerequisite: Junior/senior standing with at least a 3.0 GPA or by special permission of the Department; consent of supervising faculty member and Department prior to registration. (See department for proposal deadlines.)

 

Speech Communication 492: Off-Campus Study (1-15).

Prerequisite: Junior/senior standing with at least a 3.0 GPA or by special permission of the Department; consent of supervising faculty member and Department prior to registration. (See department for proposal deadlines.)

 

Speech Communication 493: Independent Study (1-15).

Selected readings/research in an area of Speech Communication to be determined by the student in consultation with supervising faculty member. Ordinarily, area of study not a part of departmental curriculum. Application forms available in departmental office. Prerequisite: Junior/senior standing with at least a 3.0 GPA or by special permission of the Department; consent of supervising faculty member and Department prior to registration. (See department for proposal deadlines.)

 

Speech Communication 499: Proseminar in Speech Communication (3).

Major theoretical perspectives in Speech Communication, their interrelationships and applications. The course will cover at least two or more areas of the discipline. Prerequisite: Senior standing and completion of at least 12 hours of major requirements in Speech Communication. Writing-emphasis course.