WHAT IS A RESOLUTION?

    Resolutions are the primary tools of discussion in the United Nations. They form the basis for all UN Debate, bringing one or more issues to the floor in a form that Delegates can discuss, amend, and reject or ratify as circumstances dictate.

    Resolutions usually state a policy that the United Nations will undertake, but the also may be in the form of treaties, conventions and declarations in some bodies. They range from very general to very specific in content. Depending on the body involved, they may call for or suggest a course of action, condemn an action, or require action or sanctions in the part of the member states. the General Assembly and Economic and Social Council may only call for or suggest actions. It should be noted that no body other than the Security Council may require action or sanctions from member states. In some cases, final conventions or treaties may also require action, but this would only be on the part of the signatory nations.

    Amendments to resolutions are the means by which resolutions may be altered by the body involved. Amendments would create additions, deletions or changes to a resolution in order to increase its acceptability to all nations involved. Amendment are usually needed for a body to move toward a consensus on a resolution.

 

THE FORMAT FOR DRAFTING RESOLUTIONS

    Draft Resolutions are written in a standard format. Each draft should be written as a single sentence, with commas and semicolons separating the various parts. It is expected that all delegations following outline when preparing their draft resolutions.

1. The Heading

The Heading at the top of the resolution is very important as it is used to facilitate the work of the Secretariat and the Committee Chair in processing the draft resolution. The Heading includes the subject of the resolution (agenda topic), the name of the Committee/Council to which it will be presented, and the name or names of the sponsoring countries.

2. The Text

A. Preamble

This part of the resolution is designed to explain the purpose of the draft and to state the primary reasons for support of the operative clauses which follow. The perambulatory clauses often refer to earlier United Nations resolutions, appropriate articles of the United Nations Charter, or other United Nations actions. It begins in all caps with the name of the body to which the resolution is being submitted. The preamble may not be amended.

B. Operative Clauses

The numbered operative clauses take the form of recommendations for actions or a statement of opinions concerning the situation. Operative clauses are the statement of policy in a resolution. The draft may request action by the United Nations members, Secretariat, or other United Nations bodies. The operative clauses begin with a verb to denote an action, and each clause usually addresses no more than one specific aspect of the action to be taken. Operative clauses may be amended.

Phrase Guide

This is where lists of the Perambulatory and Operative Phrases can be found. We suggest you use them when writing your Resolutions.

A SAMPLE RESOLUTION

SUBJECT OF RESOLUTION: ECONOMIC AID AND DEVELOPMENT IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

SUBMITTED TO: ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COUNCIL

SUBMITTED BY: BENIN

THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COUNCIL,

RECOGNIZING the situation of need in many developing nations concerning the humanitarian issue of poor, if existing, housing, inefficient agricultural methods, lack of clean water, and lack of basic medical needs,

GRATEFUL for the aid given by developed countries to Benin in the form of loans and development programs,

BELIEVING THAT countries could mutually benefit through the establishment of development programs such as the ones in place of Benin,

1.    CALLS UPON able nations to send building materials and engineers to help educate and facilitate the building of shelter by and for people of developing countries;

2.    SUGGESTS that developed countries offer agricultural assistance in the form of education and send money to developing countries working in conjunction with the World Food Program (WFP) with the aim of making the use of wasted farm land more efficient and reducing the threat of hunger;

3.    DRAWS ATTENTION TO the services of the World Health Organization (WHO) and encourages developing nations to work in conjunction with WHO in establishing a plan with the goal of universal immunization, vaccination, and health education.