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Eastern Hemlock

Latin name:
Tsuga canadensis

Extracted from a waterfront pier near Wilmington, Delaware, the tree used to make this portion of the pier
actually came from a forest located in central Pennsylvania. The outermost tree ring dates to the late 1830s.

Giant Sequoia

Latin name:
Sequoiadendron giganteum

A close up of numerous fire scars on a giant sequoia cross section from Sequoia National Park in California, dating back well prior to A.D. 1000. Look closely! Can you find the sad bearded face cradled by his hands, as if he was crying?

Douglas-fir

Latin name:
Pseudotsuga menziesii

This photo shows the tree rings from a beam extracted many years ago from a pueblo in northeastern Arizona. The section shows many false rings and many micro-rings, suggesting this tree may have been growing in a marginal environment.

Ponderosa Pine

Latin name:
Pinus ponderosa

Close up of tree rings of a ponderosa pine collected at El Malpais National Monument in New Mexico, USA, showing tree rings centered around A.D. 1400. Notice the variability in ring widths indicative of sensitivity to year-to-year variation in precipitation.

Douglas-fir

Latin name:
Pseudotsuga menziesii

Perhaps my most requested image of tree rings, obtained from a small Douglas-fir growing in the Zuni Mountains of west-central New Mexico by my colleagues Rex Adams and Chris Baisan. Not very old, but has some of the most beautiful rings of all my displays!

White Oak

Latin name:
Quercus alba

Oak cores from the Hoskins House in Greensboro, North Carolina, site of a famous battle during the Revolutionary War. The house was built from trees cut in 1811 to 1813, not cut and built in the 1780s as the historical agency had hoped.

Ponderosa Pine

Latin name:
Pinus ponderosa

This ponderosa pine once grew at El Morro National Monument in New Mexico, USA, and was cut many years ago. Once you get up close to the stump, you can see a very old scar from a fire many hundreds of years ago that scarred the tree when it only about 12 years old!

Bahamian Pine

Latin name:
Pinus caribaea var. bahamensis

We collected many cross sections of Bahamian pines that had been cut for an industrial park on the island of Abaco, but the rings are very difficult to date! Many false rings, and the pine appears to terminate tree growth during the dry season.

Longleaf Pine

Latin name:
Pinus palustris

This cross section was one of many that came from an old crib dam across a creek that was exposed after a modern dam broke in Hope Mills, North Carolina in 2003. Such sections from old-growth longleaf pines are very rare and provide information on climate back to AD 1500!

White Oak

Latin name:
Quercus alba

Sometimes you don't have to look far to find beauty in wood, and sometimes it may not be a living tree! After an oak tree was cut a year or two before this section was obtained, decay fungi had already set in, beginning to break the wood down to its basic elements.

Southwestern White Pine

Latin name:
Pinus strobiformis

I collected this fire-scarred pine on Mt. Graham in southern Arizona in fall 1991, and it remains one of the best examples of how we can determine the season of fire by looking at the position of the scar within the ring.

Bristlecone Pine

Latin name:
Pinus longaeva

Bristlecone pines have become one of the best proxy records for those who study the history of volcanic eruptions because the cool temperatures caused by these eruptions create "frost rings" that form when the cells implode from the cold.

Eastern Redcedar

Latin name:
Juniperus virginiana

Many well-preserved eastern redcedar sections have been recovered from prehistoric sites in eastern Tennessee, and they have more than enough rings to date, but we don't have a long enough living-tree reference chronology to overlap with them!

Red Oak

Latin name:
Quercus rubra

Oak is by far the most common genus we find in the many historic structures we date using tree rings in the Southeastern U.S. The genus has good ring variability and rarely has problem rings. This section came from a historic tavern in Lexington, Virginia.

Sugar Maple

Latin name:
Acer saccharum

Maple, birch, beech, and basswood are all examples of hardwood species that form diffuse porous wood, meaning that the ring contains many small-diameter vessels all through the ring. Identifying the ring boundary on this wood type is a challenge to tree-ring scientists.

Live Oak

Latin name:
Quercus virginiana

Live oak is an example of an evergreen oak, which is not common within this genus. As such, the wood is semi-ring porous and the rings are very difficult to see and date. Ring growth is also very erratic, not forming the concentric around the tree that we require.

Douglas-fir

Latin name:
Pseudotsuga menziesii

These cores were collected on Mt. Graham in southern Arizona and show a major suppression event beginning in 1685 when missing rings became evident, followed by many micro-rings. This suppression was caused by a major wildfire in 1685!

Ponderosa Pine

Latin name:
Pinus ponderosa

I find it amazing what trees can record in their tree rings! Here we see a cross section of a pine that was damaged by a major flood in the year 1945 in the Chiricahua Mountains of southern Arizona. Notice the reaction wood that formed afterward.

Pignut Hickory

Latin name:
Carya glabra

Sometimes gray-scale imagery helps define tree rings when measuring. Although classified as "ring porous" species, the rather ill-defined tree rings in hickory tree species form large earlywood vessels and smaller latewoood vessels.

Subalpine Fir

Latin name:
Abies lasiocarpa

Decay has set in on the tree rings of this dead and downed subalpine fir that once grew on Apex Mountain in British Columbia, Canada, but the tree rings can still be measured and crossdated despite this!

White Fir

Latin name:
Abies concolor

We found a beautiful fire scar on this white fir that was used to build a cabin in the Valles Caldera of New Mexico. Thought to have been built in the early 1900s, we instead found the cabin was built form white fir and Douglas-fir trees cut in 1941.

Overcup Oak

Latin name:
Quercus lyrata

These oak cores were collected in northeastern Arkansas to investigate a change in the hydrologic regime of a wildlife refuge beginning in the 1990s. We found that trees at this site experienced a major disturbance event in the 1960s.

Western Juniper

Latin name:
Juniperus occidentalis

Near Frederick Butte in central Oregon, we discovered an unusual stand of western junipers that had the most unusual lobate growth forms we had ever seen. This site yielded a drought-sensitive chronology dating back to the AD 800s!

West Indies Pine

Latin name:
Pinus occidentalis

Above 3000 meters on the highest peak in the Carribean, we found an entire forest of these pines, many with fire scars, living on a steep rocky slope. The forest looked more like the dry ponderosa pine forests of the western U.S.

Whitebark Pine

Latin name:
Pinus albicaulis

Whitebark pines growing in the northern Rockies of the western U.S. can grow to be over 1,000 years old, but the species is slowly being decimated by the introduced white pine blister rust. Many of these ancient trees are now dead with ghostly white trunks.

Shagbark Hickory

Latin name:
Carya ovata

Curiously, tree-ring scientists rarely analyze some of the more common hardwood species in the eastern U.S., such as this hickory, perhaps because such forest interior trees may contain a weak climate signal necessary for crossdating.

Virginia Pine

Latin name:
Pinus virginiana

Blue stain found in many sections of dead pines (both in the western and eastern U.S.) is caused by a fungus carried by a pine beetle. The fungus spreads into the phloem and sapwood of living and dead pines, sometimes creating stunning patterns!

Pinyon Pine

Latin name:
Pinus edulis

Burned sections of pinyon pine are commonly found in archaeological sites in the southwestern U.S. These sections can be carefully broken or surfaced with a razor to reveal the ring structure inside to assist in dating the years of construction of the site.

Red Spruce

Latin name:
Picea rubens

Conifers in the highest elevations of the Appalachians of the eastern U.S., such as this red spruce, don't experience wildfires very often, but when fires do occur, they can create numerous fire scars even in this fire-intolerant species. Notice the growth release!

White Spruce

Latin name:
Picea glauca

This tree was located in the Canadian Rockies on the toe slope of an active avalanche path. The scar was created by a debris flow or snow avalanche which struck the tree, killing a section of the living tissue. The avalanche can therefore be dated to its exact year!

Engelmann Spruce

Latin name:
Picea engelmannii

I worked considerably in the spruce-fir forests of southern Arizona in my earliest years in dendrochronology, and learned that trees with limited sensitivity can provide a vast amount of information on the history of these forests.

Ponderosa Pine

Latin name:
Pinus ponderosa

The lava flows of El Malpais National Monument in New Mexico contain vast amounts of remnant wood, mostly ponderosa pines such as this sample, and the tree rings on these samples go back nearly 2000 years! Notice the year AD 1400 on this section.

Chestnut Oak

Latin name:
Quercus montana

In the southeastern U.S., hardwood species are often scarred by wildfire. Most often, this also will cause considerable decay in the sample, but this oak had several well preserved fire scars, suggesting fire was common in these drier, lower elevation sites.

Ponderosa Pine

Latin name:
Pinus ponderosa

I originally sampled this stump in 1991 for its fire scars, located in El Malpais National Monument of New Mexico. I found it again 20 years later and was happy you could still see the tree rings and fire scars clearly! It had originally been logged in the 1930s!

Lodgepole Pine

Latin name:
Pinus contorta

This pine is found at higher elevations in the Rocky Mountains of the western U.S. At this site in Montana, we had thought we found fire scars on these pines, but it turns out that these are scars caused by bark beetles stripping away portions of the bark.

Douglas-fir

Latin name:
Pseudotsuga menziesii

These cores illustrate the level of sensitivity to climate fluctuations in Douglas-fir trees growing in El Malpais National Monument in New Mexico. These rings show the common pattern of narrow marker rings between 1800 (on the left) and 1860 (on the right).

Douglas-fir

Latin name:
Pseudotsuga menziesii

This photo shows a close-up of the rings in the previous image. The very wide tree ring is the year 1816, the "Year Without a Summer." Cooler temperatures meant more soil water for the malpais Douglas-firs, causing a wide ring for that year!

Ponderosa Pine

Latin name:
Pinus ponderosa

Dating fire scars found in the annual rings is a major application of tree-ring dating. This photo shows two scars. Notice the wider rings that formed after the upper scar, perhaps caused by removal of competing vegetation or added nutrients.

Longleaf Pine

Latin name:
Pinus palustris

Longleaf pines have the greatest ages of all the eastern pines. They grow slowly in sandy soils of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, and have proven ideal for learning about past climate and disturbance events, if old-growth stands can be located!

Rocky Mountain Juniper

Latin name:
Juniperus scopulorum

The juniper species of the western U.S. have proven a challenge in tree-ring dating, but Rocky Mountain juniper has tree rings that are easily identified and can be crossdated. Just watch out for false rings and expanded latewood!

Douglas-fir

Latin name:
Pseudotsuga menziesii

A close-up photo of tree rings in Douglas-fir reveals the individual wood cells that make up the xylem. These are called "tracheids." Notice the change in cell wall thickness from the earlywood cells to the latewood cells along a radial file of cells.

Douglas-fir

Latin name:
Pseudotsuga menziesii

The best trees for learning about past climate will be those that grow to great ages and are particularly sensitive to year to year changes in climate. This Douglas-fir began growing around the year 200 BC and lived for nearly 1000 years!

Mesquite

Latin name:
Prosopis glandulosa

Some desert species from the mid-latitudes do form annual rings, but these diffuse-porous species have rings that are difficult to see. You can use black marker and white chalk dust to help bring out the rings! The dust fills the small vessels and the rings appear!

Norway Spruce

Latin name:
Picea abies

Spruce is the preferred genus for making high-quality wooden bodies on musical instruments. This photo shows the tree rings on the outer edge of the "Messiah" violin. Analysis of its tree rings helped show that the violin was contemporary with Stradivari!

Black Locust

Latin name:
Robinia pseudoacacia

In the eastern U.S., this common hardwood species has beautiful tree rings that demonstrate the ring porous wood type. The tree species, however, has some of the densest wood found in North America and is extremely difficult to core!

White Oak

Latin name:
Quercus alba

Oak is a major genus used to build log structures in the eastern U.S. Sometimes, however, we find that the individual trees experienced some major disturbances that caused very aberrant rings, making crossdating all but impossible.

Palo Verde

Latin name:
Parkinsonia florida

A common tree species in the American Southwest, palo verde is a diffuse porous species that forms very indistinct tree rings. As a result, little tree-ring research has been performed on this genus. Best to use complete cross sections, when available.

Ponderosa Pine

Latin name:
Pinus ponderosa

A major application of tree-ring research is learning about insect populations. For example, pandora moth defoliated the needles on this tree, causing some narrow rings to be produced. We can use this pattern to learn about insect populations over many centuries!

Table Mountain Pine

Latin name:
Pinus pungens

The analysis of fire scars in tree rings can also be applied to pine species growing in the eastern U.S. Table Mountain pine has proven to be the best species in the Appalachian Mountains for learning about past wildfires!

Subalpine Fir

Latin name:
Abies lasiocarpa

Subalpine fir grows in the highest elevations of the southern Rocky Mountains and forms fairly compacent ring series. Sometime between 1979 and 1980, this tree was stripped almost completely of its bark by a black bear, but it still survived in one small area!

Florida Torreya

Latin name:
Torreya taxifolia

Perhaps the rarest conifer in the U.S., this species is on the brink of extinction because its habitat is facing mounting pressure from rapid changes in its native environment. It forms very nice tree rings, but few adult individuals are left to analyze.

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get in touch

Positions in Dendrochronology

The dendrochronological community is a small one relative to other scientific disciplines. This makes making connections difficult, especially in the job market. I hope to fill this gap by providing information on jobs available and of interest to the tree-ring community. If you would like to post an announcement on this page for a job position, send a message to me using the email address at the top of this page. If we all participate, we'll all benefit!



Postdoctoral Researcher
Czech University of Life Sciences in Prague

We are seeking a postdoctoral researcher to join our team within the Forest Dynamics Lab of the Department of Forest Ecology, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Sciences in Prague, Czech Republic. The project is titled “Disturbance regimes as drivers of structural variability, carbon dynamics and biodiversity at the stand and landscape levels in primary mountain forests in central and eastern Europe.”

Disturbance plays a dominant role in shaping the structure and function of forest ecosystems, but quantification of disturbance effects is typically limited by missing information on a location’s history and a region’s disturbance regime. Our lab uses tree-ring data to reconstruct site histories, providing insight into how forest characteristics recover from disturbances of variable severity. We are particularly interested in linking patterns in the severity and frequencies of disturbance to variation in tree size structure, carbon dynamics and biodiversity.

The Carpathian forest region is ecologically unique in maintaining two co- mingling monospecific forest types broadly distributed across gradients of external drivers. The project will link biomass and biodiversity indicators to disturbance histories in primary forests that permit such direct contrasts of endogenous and exogenous drivers. The project will therefore provide novel insights on whether the predictions of present biomass and forest biodiversity indicators can be improved by more accurately partitioning the relative importance of exogenous and endogenous drivers. At the same time, this project will be the first to reconstruct biomass trends in large patches of primary forests in central and eastern Europe, while most other studies tend to be based on national forest inventories in managed forests, which greatly limits the ability to infer the long term dynamics of forest development. The proposed project will be organized into interlinked work packages subdivided into research questions focusing on quantification of the main drivers of forest dynamics and biomass and biodiversity indicators responses.

WP 1. Drivers of disturbance dynamics

WP 2. Tree growth history and forest biomass WP 3. Stand structural diversity and biodiversity indicators

The successful candidate will have access to a completed database of 20 000 tree cores collected from 1000 forest plots distributed throughout remaining patches of old-growth forest is central and eastern Europe. Plots are distributed in a hierarchical design (i.e. plots nested within stands, within landscapes throughout the Carpathian mountain range). The aim of the design is to partition the effects of disturbance effects at a variety of scales, from local variation among neighboring locations due to smaller-scale gap dynamics to more extreme events impacting entire landscapes.

The selected candidate will be expected to lead projects using available tree- ring data to link tree growth, disturbances and biomass dynamics to abiotic and biotic factors. Responsibilities will predominantly be data analysis and manuscript preparation. Opportunities to visit some of our impressive field locations will be available, but the candidate is not expected to participate in data collection.

We are a young and energetic research team with close collaborations with international partners. Opportunities exist for international exchange visits and meetings. To obtain more information about our team, visit http://scholar.google.cz/citations?user=DaBJTM4AAAAJ

Applicants should have a PhD (at the time of hire) in environmental or related sciences (biology, ecology, geography, forest sciences), and excellent English communication and writing skills on the level of native speaker is essential.

Salary: 45 000 – 60 000 CZK based on the previous experience and performance.

We offer a 2-year position. The starting monthly salary represents double of the median salary in the Czech Republic. To compare living costs see here:

https://www.expatistan.com/cost-of-living

In addition, there is a share increase based on the personal performance.

Applications: Please attach a CV listing skills and qualifications, a list of publications and other documents deemed important by the applicant. Applicants should provide a short statement outlining why they believe themselves to be suitable for the above position. Applicants should include contact information for two references, one being the current or most recent employer.

Send the application to the following address:

Miroslav Svoboda

Email: svobodam@fld.czu.cz

Postal address: Czech University of Life Science, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Science, Kamycka 129, Praha 6 Suchdol, 16521, Czech Republic

 


Two Ph.D. Positions in Foerst Ecology
Czech University of Life Sciences

We are seeking two highly motivated Ph.D. researchers to join our team within the Forest Dynamics Lab of the Department of Forest Ecology, Czech University of Life Sciences  in Prague, Czech Republic. Our current research is focused on how disturbance regimes drive structural variability, carbon dynamics, and biodiversity at stand and landscape scales in primary mountain forests in central and Eastern Europe. Despite the long history of land use, this region of Europe still has extensive remnants  of primary mountain forests, particularly in the Carpathian and Dinaric mountain ranges. The large sub-continental region covered by the current research project includes the two dominant forest types in Europe, Norway spruce and mixed broad-leaf forests dominated by European beech. The aim of the current project is to quantify how disturbances influence forest structure, C dynamics, biodiversity and the multiple pathways of stand development that contribute to complex structure across these two forest types. Based on a unique set  of established plots across several forest landscapes, detailed reconstructions of past disturbance histories will allow us to quantify spatio-temporal structural patterns and  C dynamics along forest development pathways at stand, local, and landscape levels, as well as across environmental and climatic gradients. The activities, together with our team, will include field-work, laboratory processing  of samples (mainly tree cores), statistically analyzing data, compiling results, and preparing peer-reviewed publications in international science journals.

Two positions are available:  1) Forest Ecology Ph.D. - the first position will focus on reconstructing disturbance histories using tree ring data and examining links with current forest structure, composition, and indicators of biodiversity. This position will include field-work;  2) Dendroecology Ph.D. - the second position will focus more on dendroecological analyses of existing tree ring data (current database of 20,000 tree cores from 1000 forest plots across the study region) to examine links between tree growth and abiotic and biotic factors. Although the candidate for the second position is not expected to participate in field-work, there will be opportunities to visit impressive locations of old-growth forests across  the region.

We are a young and energetic research team with close collaborations with international partners. Opportunities exist for exchange visits and meetings. To obtain more information about our team, visit http://scholar.google.cz/citations?user=DaBJTM4AAAAJ Applicants should have a MSc (or equivalent) in environmental or related sciences (biology, ecology, geography, forest sciences), and good English communication and writing skills. Ideal candidates would have strong analytical skills, experience with large datasets and R, and some past experience working with tree rings, particularly for the second position. Both positions include a monthly salary of 800 Euros.
 
Applications: Please indicate which position you are applying for and attach a CV listing your skills and qualifications. Applicants should also provide a short statement outlining why they believe themselves to be suitable for the above positions, as well as contact information for at least one reference. Applications are due by May 15th, 2018, and successful candidates would start in October 2018.

Send the application by email to both of the following contacts: svobodam@fld.czu.cz  Postal address: Czech University of Life Science, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Science, Kamycka 129, Praha 6 Suchdol, 16521, Czech Republic

 


Ph.D. Position in Dendroecology
TU Dresden, Germany

At the Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Department Forest Sciences, the Chair of Forest Growth and Woody Biomass Production invites applications for the position of a

Research Assistant / Ph.D. student (E 13 TV-L, 50%)

The position is available immediately, fixed-term for a duration of three years. The period of employment is governed by the Fixed Term Research Contracts Act (Wissenschafts- zeitvertragsgesetz - WissZeitVG). The position offers the chance to obtain further academic qualification (usually Ph.D.).

Short project description: In cooperation with State Forestry Service Mecklenburg-Pomerania, effects of global change, in particular effects of climate change and increased nitrogen deposition, will be investigated on the growth and vitality of forests in Mecklenburg-Pomerania. Monitoring data on crown condition and diverse site factors (e.g. nutrient status), which was collected since 1986, is available to the project for 59 sites, mainly stocked with Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). The existing dataset will be extended with tree-ring data (tree-ring width and wood anatomical parameters), allowing for multifactorial analyses on numerous timely questions, e.g. how trees cope with co-occurring changes in environmental conditions, such as acidification, increased nitrogen deposition and global warming.

Tasks: Independent and cooperative scientific research activities in the field of dendrochronology (tree-ring science); Implementation of the research project, evaluation and interpretation of the results; Publication of results in scientific journals. Teaching experience can be obtained based upon interest.

Requirements: A university degree (M.Sc. or similar) in forestry, biology, geography, landscape ecology or a closely related discipline; experience with dendrochronology is useful. We are looking for first-class university graduates with good statistical knowledge (multivariate statistics), very good written and oral English language skills (knowledge of the German language is an asset), and with a high motivation and ability to accomplish intensive field and laboratory work, independently and in a team. Experience with the R programming language is desirable, as is a driver’s license (class B).

Women are particularly encouraged to apply, as are people with disabilities.

Please send your application documents (motivation letter, CV, copies of certificates, names and contacts of two references) latest 02.05.2018 (stamped arrival date of the university central mail service applies), to: TU Dresden, Fakultät Umweltwissenschaften, Fachrichtung Forstwissenschaften, Professur für Waldwachstum und Produktion von Holzbiomasse, Frau Prof. Dr. Marieke van der Maaten-Theunissen, 01062 Dresden or preferably as a single PDF-document via the SecureMail Portal of TU Dresden (https://securemail.tu-dresden.de) to marieke.theunissen@tu-dresden.de. Please do not send original documents, as the applications will not be returned. Travel expenses for the job interview cannot be reimbursed. Legally binding is the German version of the announcement, available at www.tu-dresden.de.

 


Postdoctoral Fellowship
Université du Québec à Chicoutimi

We are recruiting a post-doctoral research scientist for the spatial characterization of tree growth by the integration of spatially-continuous variables. The selected candidate will be based at the Université du Québec à Chicoutimi (QC, Canada) and will participate to a project involving academic and governmental scientists aiming to (1) describe the spatial pattern of tree phenology and radial growth across the boreal forest of Quebec, (2) identify and quantify the effect of climate on these patterns, (3) construct spatially explicit models of radial growth. Within this scope, opportunities exist to develop and explore new challenging research questions of interest. This position offers an exciting opportunity to lead a research activity, demonstrate your quantitative skill, build international collaborations, and publish in high impact journals.

We are seeking applicants with a PhD in forest sciences, geography or other related disciplines associated to a demonstrated experience in plant ecology or ecophysiology. Competitive applicants must have a demonstrated knowledge in geomatics and GIS environment (ArcGIS or QGIS), experience in programming (R or Python) to manage big datasets, ability to interact and collaborate with other scientists and students, record of publication in the peer-reviewed literature as a first author, self-motivation, critical thinking and communication skills. Fluent written and oral English is required.

We expect that the selected post-doctoral scientist (1) develops his/her own research activity in an autonomous and independent way, (2) works in collaboration and stimulates critical discussions with the colleagues of the project, (3) creates scientific manuscripts based on the results of the research, (4) provide enthusiastic guidance and assistance to the students carrying out related works.

This position will remain open until a suitable candidate is found. Beginning: as soon as the position is filled. The stipend, set at $ 43,000 per year (including employer fees), can be enhanced with satisfactory performance. The stipend is guaranteed for one year, with possibility of extension for a second year. Funding is available for travel costs to attend project-related team meetings and conferences.

Interested applicants should contact Sergio Rossi (sergio.rossi@uqac.ca) by sending the candidature in form of a single pdf including (1) a cover letter explaining how the skills required for this position are met, (2) a complete CV, (3) transcripts of master and PhD, and (4) names and contact information for three references. More information on the lab activities is available at www.cef-cfr.ca/index.php?n=Membres.SergioRossi

 


PostDoc Oxygen Isotopes in Tree Rings
Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL

The Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL is a part of the ETH domain. Approximately 500 people work on the sustainable use and protection of the environment and on the handling of natural hazards. The Research Unit Forest Dynamics explores the functional significance of forest diversity with respect to the ecology of managed and unmanaged forests and evaluates future forest development in temperate regions and high mountain systems. From 1 April 2018, the Research Group Dendrosciences offers a 2-year postdoc position on oxygen isotopes in tree rings.. 
 
You will coordinate and conduct a project that aims at seamlessly disentangling leaf water and source water signals in oxygen isotope records of tree rings for their use as climatic and tree physiological proxy. To achieve this aim, you will build upon a unique, already existing data set of precipitation, soil, xylem and needle water measured at our long-term monitoring site Lötschental/Swiss Alps. In addition you will produce a well-replicated set of highly resolved tree-ring records, and conduct an irrigation experiment with glacier water. Combining this great set of empirical data with the most advanced mechanistic isotope models will allow you to gain unrivalled integrated insight into the pathways and environmental dependencies of tree-ring signals. You will be part of a lively interdisciplinary team of inter-/national scientists, present your results at international conferences and publish in ISI-journals.
 
You have a PhD in environmental sciences or related disciplines, and corresponding publication record. You have knowledge of the mechanisms of isotope fractionation along the atmosphere-soil-plant continuum, and good experience in applying statistical and mechanistic models. You enjoy field and lab work, data analysis and writing. Teamwork within the group and with project partners requires very good spoken and written English language skills. You work self-dependent, structured, innovative and are communicative and team oriented.
 
Please send your complete application to Stefania Pe, Human Resources WSL. Dr. Kerstin Treydte, phone +41 (0)44 739 2662, will be happy to answer any questions or offer further information. The WSL strives to increase the proportion of women in its employment, which is why qualified women are particularly called upon to apply for this position.

 


PhD and MS Positions in Riparian Dendroecology
SUNY-ESF

We seek three well-qualified PhD and Masters students to join two funded projects investigating drought and its impact on riparian vegetation in the Southwestern USA (Arizona and California). The overall projects combine a range of methods (dendrochronology, forest inventories, stable isotopes, remote sensing, and hydrological modeling) to explore the effects of drought and climate change on riparian woodlands, and to develop water stress indicators to assess forest health at multiple scales. The projects are funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and US Department of Defense’s Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), and
emphasize the sustainability and management of riparian ecosystems in drought-prone landscapes. Research questions will focus on riparian ecosystem response to drought and methods will include field sampling to inventory riparian forest structure and health, collecting and analyzing tree rings for growth trends and annual water use efficiency using carbon isotopes, and assessing critical thresholds for riparian forest decline.
 
We welcome applications from motivated, curious students with experience in ecological research. Ideal candidates will have a BS or MS in ecology, environmental science, or a related field; a strong quantitative and statistical background; the ability to work in remote field settings; and interest in riparian forest ecology and tree ecophysiology in dryland regions. Positions start in Fall 2018 and are funded for a minimum of three years for PhD and two years for Masters students, and provides a competitive stipend, tuition and benefits. More detail below.
 
Project Inquiries (please contact me before applying):
John Stella, SUNY-ESF; stella@esf.edu
Department of Forest and Natural Resources Management
State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Research page: http://www.esf.edu/fnrm/stella/default.htm
Collaborators: Michael Singer (UCSB and Cardiff Univ.), Kelly Caylor (UCSB),
Dar Roberts, (UCSB)

Email inquiries should include: Brief statement of interest and experience, CV, transcripts, GRE scores, English proficiency scores (if applicable). Research writing samples are also welcome.
 
Projects:
•   Linking basin-scale, stand-level, and individual tree water stress indicators for groundwater-dependent riparian forests in multiple-use river basins (NSF-funded)
 
•   Detection of forest water stress due to climate change in drought-prone regions of the Southwestern USA (SERDP-funded)
 
Project background:
Managing water resources is increasingly challenging in many river basins globally as the climate becomes warmer and drier. Human demand on water resources, particularly groundwater, is high in multiple-use river basins where significant withdrawals occur for intensive agriculture and industry.
The interaction between high groundwater extraction by humans and climatic drought, such as that which is currently affecting large areas of the U.S. Southwest, can result in rapidly declining water tables with strongly negative consequences for groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDEs).
Riparian forests, which are hotspots of biodiversity and support key functions and habitats within river corridors, are particularly sensitive to drought, climate change, and declining groundwater water levels, with reduced growth, vigor, and physiological function. These conditions, if they persist, lead to riparian forest decline, with substantial risks to the ecosystems they support
and the services they provide to society.

These projects will use a suite of interdisciplinary methods to measure water stress in riparian forests that are linked to changes in climate and groundwater availability. The interdisciplinary project team from SUNY-ESF, Cardiff University, and UC Santa Barbara, in collaboration with The Nature Conservancy and other partners, will couple high-resolution remote sensing with field-based tree-ring research and groundwater well data to develop water stress indicators across a range of geographic scales from individual trees to forest stands to an entire riparian corridor. The ultimate goal of the project is to identify trends and thresholds in forest response to groundwater decline
that can be used to develop sustainable groundwater management approaches for protecting groundwater-dependent ecosystems in multiple-use river basins.

 


Postdoc in Dendroecology
Czech University of Life Sciences

Type of employment: Temporary position – until the end of 2020 (with possibility to extend to permanent positon) Working hours: Full time First day of employment: summer or fall 2018 Number of positions: 1
 
Czech University of Life Sciences in Prague, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Sciences

We are seeking a postdoctoral researcher to join our team within the Forest Dynamics Lab of the Department of Forest Ecology, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Sciences in Prague, Czech Republic. The project is titled “Disturbance regimes as drivers of structural variability, carbon dynamics and biodiversity at the stand and landscape levels in primary mountain forests in central and eastern Europe.”

Disturbance plays a dominant role in shaping the structure and function of forest ecosystems, but quantification of disturbance effects is typically limited by missing information on a location’s history and a region’s disturbance regime. Our lab uses tree-ring data to reconstruct site histories, providing insight into how forest characteristics recover from disturbances of variable severity. We are particularly interested in linking patterns in the severity and frequencies of disturbance to variation in tree size structure, carbon dynamics and biodiversity.

The Carpathian forest region is ecologically unique in maintaining two co- mingling monospecific forest types broadly distributed across gradients of external drivers. The project will link biomass and biodiversity indicators to disturbance histories in primary forests that permit such direct contrasts of endogenous and exogenous drivers. The project will therefore provide novel insights on whether the predictions of present biomass and forest biodiversity indicators can be improved by more accurately partitioning the relative importance of exogenous and endogenous drivers. At the same time, this project will be the first to reconstruct biomass trends in large patches of primary forests in central and eastern Europe, while most other studies tend to be based on national forest inventories in managed forests, which greatly limits the ability to infer the long term dynamics of forest development. The proposed project will be organized into interlinked work packages subdivided into research questions focusing on quantification of the main drivers of forest dynamics and biomass and biodiversity indicators responses.
WP 1. Drivers of disturbance dynamics
WP 2. Tree growth history and forest biomass WP 3. Stand structural diversity and biodiversity indicators

The successful candidate will have access to a completed database of 20 000 tree cores collected from 1000 forest plots distributed throughout remaining patches of old-growth forest is central and eastern Europe. Plots are distributed in a hierarchical design (i.e. plots nested within stands, within landscapes throughout the Carpathian mountain range). The aim of the design is to partition the effects of disturbance effects at a variety of scales, from local variation among neighboring locations due to smaller-scale gap dynamics to more extreme events impacting entire landscapes.

The selected candidate will be expected to lead projects using available tree- ring data to link tree growth, disturbances and biomass dynamics to abiotic and biotic factors. Responsibilities will predominantly be data analysis and manuscript preparation. Opportunities to visit some of our impressive field locations will be available, but the candidate is not expected to participate in data collection.

We are a young and energetic research team with close collaborations with international partners. Opportunities exist for international exchange visits and meetings. To obtain more information about our team, visit http://scholar.google.cz/citations?user=DaBJTM4AAAAJ

Applicants should have a PhD (at the time of hire) in environmental or related sciences (biology, ecology, geography, forest sciences), and excellent English communication and writing skills on the level of native speaker is essential.

Salary: 45000–60000 CZK based on the previous experience and performance. We offer a 2-year position. The starting monthly salary represents double of the median salary in the Czech Republic. To compare living costs see here: https://www.expatistan.com/cost-of-living. In addition, there is a share increase based on the personal performance.

Applications: Please attach a CV listing skills and qualifications, a list of publications and other documents deemed important by the applicant. Applicants should provide a short statement outlining why they believe themselves to be suitable for the above position. Applicants should include contact information for two references, one being the current or most recent employer.

Send the application to the following address:
Marketa Chaloupkova
Email: chaloupkovam@fld.czu.cz
Postal address: Czech University of Life Science, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Science, Kamycka 129, Praha 6 Suchdol, 16521, Czech Republic

 

Assistantships for Master's Students
Oklahoma State University

Multiple opportunities for graduate study in plant ecology (including dendroecology) and evolutionary biology are available for Fall 2018 in the Department of Plant Biology, Ecology and Evolution at Oklahoma State University.  Teaching assistantships are available for study towards an MS in Plant Biology or a PhD in Plant Science.  Potential areas of research could include:

Trade-offs in drought tolerance among tree species at the forest-prairie ecotone

The roles of drought stress, fungal pathogens, and insects in tree mortality

Tree-ring growth response to climate among species at the forest-prairie ecotone

The role of anthropogenic change in shaping plant-pollinator interactions and plant reproductive output

The role of ecological interactions in plant mating system evolution

Comparative plant genomics, evolution, and systematics

Evolution of milkweed-insect interactions

Plant taxonomy and biogeography

Assistantships include tuition waivers and health insurance. Learn more about the OSU Department of Plant Biology, Ecology, and Evolution at http://plantbio.okstate.edu/.  Contact Dr. Henry Adams (henry.adams@okstate.edu, www.henrydadams.com), Dr. Janette Steets (janette.steets@okstate.edu), or Dr. Mark Fishbein (mark.fishbein@okstate.edu) for more information.  In your email, please include brief description of your research interests, experience, and career goals, and attach a CV or resume. Applications are due to the OSU graduate college by 2/28/18, but early application is strongly advised for full consideration and support.



Postdoctoral Researcher
Czech University of Life Sciences in Prague

We are seeking a postdoctoral researcher to join our team within the Forest Dynamics Lab of the Department of Forest Ecology, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Sciences in Prague, Czech Republic. The project is titled “Disturbance regimes as drivers of structural variability, carbon dynamics and biodiversity at the stand and landscape levels in primary mountain forests in central and eastern Europe."

 Disturbance plays a dominant role in shaping the structure and function of forest ecosystems, but quantification of disturbance effects is typically limited by missing information on a location’s history and a region’s disturbance regime. Our lab uses tree-ring data to reconstruct site histories, providing insight into how forest characteristics recover from disturbances of variable severity. We are particularly interested in linking patterns in the severity and frequencies of disturbance to variation in tree size structure, carbon dynamics and biodiversity.

The Carpathian forest region is ecologically unique in maintaining two co- mingling monospecific forest types broadly distributed across gradients of external drivers. The project will link biomass and biodiversity indicators to disturbance histories in primary forests that permit such direct contrasts of endogenous and exogenous drivers. The project will therefore provide novel insights on whether the predictions of present biomass and forest biodiversity indicators can be improved by more accurately partitioning the relative importance of exogenous and endogenous drivers. At the same time, this project will be the first to reconstruct biomass trends in large patches of primary forests in central and eastern Europe, while most other studies tend to be based on national forest inventories in managed forests, which greatly limits the ability to infer the long term dynamics of forest development. The proposed project will be organized into interlinked work packages subdivided into research questions focusing on quantification of the main drivers of forest dynamics and biomass and biodiversity indicators responses.

WP 1. Drivers of disturbance dynamics
WP 2. Tree growth history and forest biomass
WP 3. Stand structural diversity and biodiversity indicators

The successful candidate will have access to a completed database of 20 000 tree cores collected from 1000 forest plots distributed throughout remaining patches of old-growth forest is central and eastern Europe. Plots are distributed in a hierarchical design (i.e. plots nested within stands, within landscapes throughout the Carpathian mountain range). The aim of the design is to partition the effects of disturbance effects at a variety of scales, from local variation among neighboring locations due to smaller-scale gap dynamics to more extreme events impacting entire landscapes. The selected candidate will be expected to lead projects using available tree- ring data to link tree growth, disturbances and biomass dynamics to abiotic and biotic factors. Responsibilities will predominantly be data analysis and manuscript preparation. Opportunities to visit some of our impressive field locations will be available, but the candidate is not expected to participate in data collection.

We are a young and energetic research team with close collaborations with international partners. Opportunities exist for international exchange visits and meetings. To obtain more information about our team, visit http://scholar.google.cz/citations?user=DaBJTM4AAAAJ

Applicants should have a PhD (at the time of hire) in environmental or related sciences (biology, ecology, geography, forest sciences), and excellent English communication and writing skills on the level of native speaker is essential.   Salary: 45000 –60 000 CZK based on the previous experience and performance. We offer a 2-year position. The starting monthly salary represents double of the median salary in the Czech Republic. To compare living costs see here: https://www.expatistan.com/cost-of-living In addition, there is a share increase based on the personal performance.

Applications: Please attach a CV listing skills and qualifications, a list of publications and other documents deemed important by the applicant. Applicants should provide a short statement outlining why they believe themselves to be suitable for the above position. Applicants should include contact information for two references, one being the current or most recent employer.   Send the application to the following address: Miroslav Svoboda Email: svobodam@fld.czu.cz Postal address: Czech University of Life Science, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Science, Kamycka 129, Praha 6 Suchdol, 16521, Czech Republic

 

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