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Contributors

Jody Dunville is a Master's student at the University of Tennessee, specializing in postcolonial theory and African Literature. His Bachelor's degree is in English Literature from the University of Houston, and he hopes to continue his studies and earn a Ph.D.

Brandon Haynes is a Master's student at the University of Tennessee, and is focusing on twentieth-century British and American literature, with a particular emphasis on Modernism.

Shannon Heath is a third-year Ph.D. in English Romanticism at the University of Tennessee.

Andrew Lallier is a doctoral candidate at the University of Tennessee. His research interests center on connecting nineteenth-century British literature with German philosophy - particularly in relation to the aesthetic and ethical legacies of Kant and his Romantic successors.

Julia P. McLeod is in her second year of Ph.D. studies at the University of Tennessee. Her work includes studies of food and culture, women's issues, and natural elements in nineteenth-century English and American literature.

Stephanie Metz is a doctoral candidate at the University of Tennessee, interested in nineteenth-century British and American literature, particularly female novelists, and gender studies.

Kat Powell is finishing her second year in the PhD program at the University of Tennessee. Her master's thesis, "To Fashion A Lady: Imperial Language of (Ad)dress in Nineteenth-Century Women's Fiction" focused on feminist-materialist concerns regarding fashion during the Victorian Era. Her current work addresses the ethics of regret in Victorian narratives.

Kelsey Ray, an undergraduate student at the University of Tennessee, is pursuing a self-designed major involving writing, fiction and foreign language and culture. One of her hobbies is website design, and she applied that interest to working on this project.

Brent Robida is a Ph.D. candidate in English Literature at the University of Tennessee and is working on a dissertation about Percy Bysshe Shelly's poetry.

John Stromski is a Ph.D. student at the University of Tennessee, whose work revolves around the political usage of Gothic tropes within nineteenth-century American literature.